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Four Elements

Margo Humphrey

by Synatra Smith, Ph.D. on 2021-08-12T12:00:00-04:00 in Black Artists | Comments

Margo Humphrey is a printmaker, sculptor, installation artist, illustrator, educator, and children’s book author. Born June 25, 1942, in Oakland, California, she earned a BFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts (now California College of the Arts) in 1972 and an MFA from Stanford University in 1974.[1] Humphrey also participated in a postgraduate program at the Whitney Museum of Art in New York while attending Stanford. She was influenced by the feminist art movement in the 1970s and describes her style as “sophisticated naïve.”[2] Humphrey taught at the University of Benin in Nigeria and Makerere University in Uganda, and her time spent in continental Africa is evident through her use of a range of bright colors in her work. She also taught at the Tamarind Institute at the University of New Mexico and became the first African American woman to have her prints published by them in 1974. Humphrey has been a professor of art at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1989.[3]

 

PMA Collection

PMA Library

 

Notes

[1] Artnet n.d.; Edmunds 2004; Otfinoski 2003; Tamarind Institute n.d.

[2] Tamarind Institute n.d.

[3] Offinoski 2003.

 

References

Artnet. “Margo Humphrey.” Accessed May 18, 2021. http://www.artnet.com/artists/margo-humphrey/biography

 

Edmunds, Allan L. 2004. “Artists Biographies.” In Three Decades of American Printmaking: The Brandywine Workshop Collection. New York: Hudson Hills Press.

 

Otfinoski, Steven. 2003. “Humphrey, Margo.” In African Americans in the Visual Arts. New York: Facts on File, Inc. 


Tamarind Institute. “Margo Humphrey.” Accessed May 18, 2021. https://tamarind.unm.edu/artist/margo-humphrey/.


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